Home School Navigator ~ Review

For the past few weeks AJ has been working on the Home School Navigator Reading and Language Arts Curriculum. The curriculum is divided into levels based on the colors of the rainbow with red being the easiest and indigo being the most difficult. AJ used the indigo level from Home School Navigator. The program is a little below her skill level since she is in high school, but we focused on the interactive notebooks portion of their program.

Home School Navigator

What is Home School Navigator?

The Home School Navigator Reading and Language Arts Curriculum takes the guess work out of planning. It is an online program that has everything your child should be doing each day all planned out for you. It uses online videos, worksheets, and more to ensure your child practices a variety of skills. While each level is a little different, they cover basically the same topics.

In the indigo level your student will have work in the following areas:

Read Aloud

Listening to books being read aloud is an important skill even for older students. Each day there is a book listed that the student should listen to. Most of the books can be easily found at the library, but we found all three of the books (Each book is used for a few days) on YouTube. AJ was able to listen to someone read the book to her each day, and I didn’t have to search for it at the library. It worked well.

Reading Skills Practice

This usually involves a short video where the student learns a new skill and is then instructed to practice that skill in a book that they are reading on their own.

Literature / Comprehension

In this section the student completes different activities based on the book they are reading. There are numerous activities ranging form finding the name of the author and publisher on the book, to discussing the story with their parent, to completing character sketches on different characters.

Writing /Grammar

This section is fairly laid back in the beginning. The student is instructed to write for 20 minutes most days. Sometimes they will have a topic other times it is up to them. Some days they may be asked to find all of a specific part of speech in the book they are reading and list the words. Other times they are told to look at their previous writing and to make adjustments to it. Later in the level they write stories and have more structured writing.

Word Study / Vocabulary

In the indigo level the student works on different word roots. In month 4 week 1 the root work is “cent” the student has vocabulary words that all use that root word. Each day they do a different activity with the words. Some of the activities include matching the definitions, writing sentences, playing games, and taking quizzes.

Computer Skills

The student is instructed to practice some type of skill. The indigo level seems to focus on typing skills and using various programs on the computer. They may be instructed to practice their keyboarding skills, or type their vocabulary sentences.

Poetry

This section introduces your student to different poets and types of poems. Often they will be asked to find the rhyme scheme of a poem or to try to decide what a poem is about.

Independent Reading

This section either has your student reading a book of their own choosing, a recommended book, or has them complete an interactive notebook. There are four interactive notebooks in the indigo level; Holes, Number the Stars, A Single Shard, and Tuck Everlasting.

Each day the student will have assignments in some of the areas listed above. Sometimes they will have just four or five assignments while other days they have eight. The best part is that you decide what you want your student to do.

What We Thought

The program is planned out very well, and aside from the books, paper, scissors and glue, it includes almost everything you need to give your student a solid year of learning. It is perfect for the homeschooler who wants things planned out for them, but wants some wiggle room as well. The lessons are short and to the point and lets the student learn at a nice pace. It is well organized and easy to find what you need. There is even the option to scan you child’s work into the system for easy record keeping. I would highly recommend this program!

The Interactive Notebooks

While the interactive notebooks are part of the program, they are also available to purchase separately. Since AJ has already read Holes, we decided to start with the second book available in the indigo level, Number the Stars.

An interactive notebook is basically like a lapbook for older students that is done in a spiral notebook. Once you download the file, you print it out. Your student cuts out the different pieces and glues them into their spiral notebook. Then as they read they answer questions about the book.

The interactive notebook for Number the Stars is 20 pages long. The student starts with some pre-reading activities where they find and color Denmark on a map and fill out a char with some basic information on the Holocaust and World War 2.

Then there are some vocabulary words for the student to define. Up next is the reading. For this book the student is assigned about four chapters at a time to read, then they have questions to answer. Questions range from simple comprehension questions, to opinions, to more advanced things like foreshadowing and themes in the book.

The more advanced literary terms are defined for the student and explained very well. The student also puts the definitions in their notebooks.

At the end there is a detailed answer key.

Since this book covers a difficult topic I read it along side of AJ. She was able to complete the interactive notebook on her own. It lead to some good discussions. Aside from the cutting and gluing, each section took about an hour to complete including the reading.

What We Thought

I love when learning can be hands on. The interactive notebooks add an element of fun that a simple book report or worksheet can’t. I was very surprised by the content in the interactive notebooks. I was expecting simple comprehension questions, but these go way further. By the time the students get to the final book they are looking at symbolism and metaphors in the book. These interactive notebooks are very well thought out and AJ will be finishing the other two that are available in the level. I wish that Home School Navigator made interactive notebooks for more advanced books. I would buy them in a heartbeat.

If you are looking for a solid language arts program, check out the Home School Navigator Reading and Language Arts Curriculum and their Interactive Notebooks. I was very impressed with how well done the program is.

Find out what other members of the homeschool review crew thought by clicking on the graphic below!

Home School Navigator Reading and Language Arts Curriculum {Home School Navigator Reviews}
 

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