Lab Reports ~ What to Include & How to Grade

As AJ gets older, I wan her to start writing better lab reports. She wants to go into a scientific field when she gets older, so knowing how to write a proper lab report will be an essential skill. She has been writing simple reports about science experiments for a while. They usually included a hypothesis and the results of the experiment.

For her 8th grade year, I decided she needed something more. I wanted her to get use to following a guideline for the report and to include age appropriate information. After looking all over for a rubric or guideline for middle school science reports, I couldn’t find what I needed. So I made one for her. I wanted to share it with you incase you are searching for a solid lab report guide for your child.

Free Lab Report Grading Sheets!

Parts of the Lab Report

Title Page – The lab title should be centered on the page. Name and date should be in the bottom right hand corner. 2 Points

Objective – One or two sentence statement that outlines the purpose of the experiment. 2 Points

Introduction – Should include detailed information about principles, terms, and techniques used. Must include a clearly stated hypothesis that is underlined. 10 Points

Materials – List all materials that were used in the experiment, including equipment. Include labeled diagram of the experiment set up. 10 Points

Procedure – Describe all of the steps for the experiment in an orderly manner. Write in paragraph form using the past impersonal tense. 10 Points

Qualitative Results – Write a description of your observations. Results should include all of the senses that you used. What did you see, hear, smell, feel, or taste? ONLY TOUCH OR TASTE IF INSTRUCTED! Include a table or sketch if needed. 15 Points

Quantitative Results – Show completed graphs and tables of measured results. Make sure units are included and that all graphs and tables are properly labeled. If any calculations were done, show a sample of each type. Show your work and explain each step.  25 Points

Conclusion – Summarize the results of the experiment. Was the objective met? Was your hypothesis correct? Do the results make sense based on prior knowledge? Was there any chance of error? What would you change if the experiment was repeated? This should be at least a paragraph. 10 Points

Bibliography – Include a works cited page for any sources you used. This should include any textbook, video, book, or website that you used for background information. You must list at least one source. Use MLA format. 6 Points EasyBib is a great website to help you with MLA format. 

Neatness and Formatting – Report should be typed and double spaced. All graphs and drawings should be neat and fit on the page correctly. 5 Points

Spelling and Grammar – Proper spelling and grammar should be used throughout the report. 5 Points

Grading the Lab Report

I started by going over each section of the lab report and what I expected from her. My goal was to help AJ get use to writing lab reports and following directions, so I was fairly lenient in grading. As long as she followed the directions and included what was necessary she received the points.  Points would be taken off for missing information, improperly labeled graphs, or sloppy work.

I had her include a Lab Report Grading Sheet with each report she completed. It lists each section of the report and the points possible. There is a place for her score as well as any notes. I was able to easily grade her report and file it away with the grading sheet.

I found that some experiments didn’t provide measureable results. When those experiments came up I gave her a Lab Report Grading Sheet without the Quantitative Results. Those reports became worth 75 points instead of 100.

I didn’t make her use this format for every lab, but I did make her write one formal report each month. Her reports have improved quite a bit and she enjoys the process.

You can download a copy of the Lab Report Grading Sheet. I also included a printable version of what the student should include in their Lab Report. I hope it helps your young scientist!

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