Planning Your Homeschool Year

Post Contains Affiliate LinksThere isn’t a right or wrong way to make a plan for your homeschool. Everyone is different and as long as you follow any laws your state requires, there are quite a few ways to make your homeschool schedule. Every year I look at our schedule and tweak it based on how our life is and how AJ is doing with the topics she is working on. This year we are  trying a more structured schedule, but we have had several different types of plans in the past.

How to plan your homeschool year

Planning Your Homeschool Year

The first step you need to take when planning your homeschool year is to decide what you want or need to cover. Depending on your state laws you may need to cover certain subjects. If your state laws are lenient then you have a few more options. To figure out what to study you can use books like What Your 5th Grader Needs to Know as a guide. You can also look up standards for students in public school to use as a guideline. If you are using a set curriculum then you should have a good idea of what your child will be learning.

A lot of times you can simply move on to the next concept once your child master’s their current one. After your child masters multiplication the next logical step would be to start division. Once your child can write a paragraph then you can work on writing a story with more than one paragraph. Those type of skills are harder to schedule, because you don’t know when your child will be ready to move to the next concept. For subjects like Math and English I like to have a list of goals and make plans up a month or week at a time based on my child’s progress.

Homeschool Planning- Goals

Once you have a basic idea about what your child will be learning it is time to plan your year. Some people like to schedule out the entire year. Others make a list of goals and once their child has mastered a goal they move to the next item on the list. One thing that I liked to do when AJ was younger was to roughly plan out what we would be learning each month and then each month make more detailed schedules.

Here is an example of how I planned out our year of Earth Science.

  • August – Basics of Earth Science
  • September – Earth Structure, Age of Earth, Fossils
  • October –  Rocks, Gems
  • November – Earthquakes, Volcanoes, Mountains
  • December – Water Cycle, Fresh Water
  • January – Oceans
  • February – Earth’s Atmosphere
  • March – Weather
  • April –  Astronomy

Then each month I would make a more detailed list for the topics we would learn about the following month. Here is an example for what we would learn about in November.

  • Week 1 – Plate Tectonics & Continental Drift, Mountains
  • Week 2 – Earthquakes – locations, causes, earthquake preparedness
  • Week 3 – Volcanoes – Ring of Fire, Hawaii
  • Week 4 – Volcanoes – Destruction, lava, Model of Volcano

Then for each week I would find resources I wanted to use. I pulled together lessons form online, books, and activity kits.

Even if you aren’t detailed I feel it is best to have a set of goals for the year so you can stay on track.

A Month at a Time

Another thing we have tried over the years is having a monthly schedule. At the beginning of each month I would look at what we had left to cover for the year and I would make a list of lessons that AJ would need to do. Then we would go down the line and when she was done with the work for that month I would make a new list.

The only real difference between scheduling out the year more at the beginning of the year or throughout the year was time. I spent more time when I made a rough scheduled of my year at the beginning of the year, but I had less to do each month. The downside was that sometimes we would stay longer on a topic than I originally scheduled so then I would need to take time and rework the schedule.

Daily Schedules

We have had a few different daily schedules as well. We have tried block scheduling, a list schedule, and a normal schedule where she completes subject daily.

Block Scheduling

This is our favorite method. We complete a large amount of work in one or two subjects a day. This is how we catch up if we get behind, and how we work if we need to finish the school week quickly. It has some downsides because your child isn’t studying the topic as often. It doesn’t always work well with subjects like reading and math. But we have seen a lot of positive things from block scheduling. It lets is dive deep into learning and lets AJ spend a long time in one subject without worrying about the other subjects that she needs to get finished.

Here is a sample of what block scheduling looked like for us.

  • Monday- 5 Math lessons, spelling grammar
  • Tuesday – 3 Literature lessons, spelling
  • Wednesday – 5 History lessons, spelling, writing
  • Thursday – 5 Science lessons, spelling, writing (This was always her favorite day)
  • Friday – 2 Literature lesson, Art, grammar

Math has always been an easy subject for her, so doing 5 lessons in one day wasn’t hard for her. We did have to split up spelling, grammar, and writing because it was too much for her to do at one time. I think block scheduling can be very beneficial.

List Schedule

We have done a list schedule quite a few times. It is simple for me. I just write a list of all the work she needs to complete during the week and she completes the work in any order. Scheduling with a list helps her to learn time management. It also lets her feel like she has a say in her school day. We did have a few weeks where she did the “fun” subjects first and left the harder subjects for the last day. It was a learning experience and now when she has a list to work with she usually makes smart decisions.

We have also used a list when we have been very busy. At times we have had to do a little bit of school 7 days a week because of doctor appointments or other family situations. When that happens we just work on the list of assignments until all of her work is done then we go to the next week. It may take a little longer, but all of her work gets done.

Regular Schedule

Now that AJ is in middle school block schedules are not as easy. Now I schedule out 1 math, 1 literature, 5 history, 5 science, 5 Spanish, 3 grammar, 3 writing, and 3 Bible and 5 spelling lessons throughout the week. She doesn’t always finish her work on the correct day, but it is a work in progress.

There is no right or wrong way to homeschool. Find a schedule that works for your family and have fun learning together. This post is part of the Back to School Blog Hop. Check out what other members of the Review Crew have to say about planning!

5 Days of Homeschool 101


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